Happy International Translation Day, 2017!

Every year, on September 30 we like to take time out and celebrate our wonderfully important translators on International Translation Day! While we in the anime community know how vital translators are, this day lifts up the worldwide translation community and promotes the translation profession in different countries — which makes it very appropriate that this year FIT’s theme for International Translation Day is “Translation and Diversity.” This year we’re thinking about how anime and manga create opportunities to learn about another culture.

We’d like to invite you to get to know our translators a little more, and join us in showing how much we appreciate everything they do!

 

Name: Nora Stevens Heath

Year I started translating professionally: 1999

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: The gods and goddesses in Inari Kon Kon interacted with mortals (and vice versa) in a much different way than I’d expected: not as equals, and still with respect, but without the superior attitude + bowing and scraping I would generally expect to see if a deity manifested Him- or Herself here on Earth. I was also touched when the goddess Uka stressed that everything has an abiding kami spirit–even game controllers. My work on this anime is what finally got me to visit the Fushimi Inari shrine in Kyoto, and I was not disappointed.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Traveling. I visited Japan for the 25th time (in 23 years!) this past summer, and trip #2 to Montreal is just around the corner.

 

Name: Duane Johnson

Year I started translating professionally: 2001

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: I already knew quite a bit about US anime fandom at the time, but working on Genshiken required me to jump into the deep end as far as learning about Japanese fandom goes. My research on Comiket and doujinshi culture in particular proved to be quite enlightening.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Watching vintage TV shows and movies, or playing retro video games. Get off muh lawn!

 

Name: Jo-Ann Lieu

Year I started translating professionally: 2015

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: TSUKIUTA. The characters’ last names are the traditional Japanese names for the months they are associated with, so getting to know the characters made it easier to remember those.

When I’m not translating, I’m: wishing I could take a nap, or listening to an audiobook while playing a game on my phone.

 

Name: Nita Lieu

Year I started translating professionally: 2008

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: While translating Rolling Girls, I learned a lot about specific regions in Japan. I also learned songs by the iconic Japanese band The Blue Hearts, which I sometimes sing in karaoke. 😀

When I’m not translating, I’m: singing karaoke, listening to audiobooks, taking walks, playing games on my phone, going to ballet class, watching Japanese musicals and stage plays, hanging out with my book club……

 

Name: Sarah Alys Lindholm

Year I started translating professionally: 2003

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: Yu Yu Hakusho and Yami no Matsuei. They both represented the afterlife as full of paperwork and red tape, and that fascinated me so much I spent a whole weekend reading about Japanese conceptions of the afterlife.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Playing handbells. Bass ringers, represent!

 

Name: Clyde Mandelin

Year I started translating professionally: 2002

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: From Shin-chan, I learned unique ways of being crude in Japanese. And that Japanese kids really hate green peppers. Give me them, I’ll eat your green peppers for you. From Summer Wars, I learned how to play Japanese hanafuda card games. But now I forget it all. From Noragami, I learned all about Japanese deities and religious rituals that used to be a mystery to me. From Detective Conan/Case Closed, I learned about famous Japanese mystery writers, and that that boy has seen way too many murders by now to be a coincidence.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Writing books and petting cats, but lately I’ve been smashing bicycles, eating ramen, racing cars, and trying to find Makimura Makoto.

 

Name: Masako Ollivier

Year I started translating professionally: 2003

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: With the Light. This manga helped me to realize that treatment options for, and understanding of, people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in Japan lags behind the US, and as a Japanese woman, I hope that the manga helps raise awareness about ASD in Japan.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Reading, or playing Overcooked, Pet Rescue, and Tsum Tsum.

 

Name: Jackson Pietsch (pronounced “peach”)

Year I started translating professionally: 2014

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: Silver Spoon. Got a glimpse both into schooling options for kids who don’t take the normal academic high school track, and into agriculture and perspectives on things like humane treatment of animals.

When I’m not translating, I’m: Taiko drumming or doing crosswords.

 

Name: Shoko Oono

Year I started translating professionally: 2001

An anime or manga that taught me something new about Japanese culture: The Sengoku Basara series. Growing up in the States, Japanese history is barely covered in high school, so there was a lot that was new to me. Not because Sengoku Basara is so historically accurate. I mean, motorcycle handle bars on horses… Right? But when you don’t know the material, you gotta do the research, so I learned a lot that way. It’s mind boggling how many of the characters in the show weren’t even historically alive to meet each other!

When I’m not translating, I’m: mothering a new addition to the family.

Thank you to all of our translators! We are so grateful for your tireless work, and for helping us to better enjoy the anime we love so much!

THANK YOU!

 

 

 

The post Happy International Translation Day, 2017! appeared first on Funimation – Blog!.

Source: FUNimation

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*